*Based on IRI unit share data

What are the different kinds of rodent control measures?

General Questions 

 
 How do d-CON® products compare to others on the market?
 What are the different kinds of rodent control measures?

Commercially available mouse and rat control products are effective and fall into two different categories – baits and traps.

Baits are available in pellets or blocks contained in a bait station. Baits should be used in low traffic, hard-to-reach areas such as basements, garages and attics. Baits are an ideal way to avoid contact with rodents, because once they've eaten the bait, they leave the area to die, generally going outside to seek water. Baits are safe and highly effective if used according to directions.

Most common rat and mouse poisons fall into the anticoagulant category. These products, long-acting warfarins, reduce the clotting of blood, and result in death from internal bleeding or anemia, usually within 4-10 days.

Traps are ideal for high traffic areas. Three types of traps are used commercially: snap traps, glue traps and live traps.

Snap traps are the traditional wooden design and they are baited with food like peanut butter, nuts or cheese. Snap traps are intended to be humanely lethal, but require disposal of a dead or injured rodent.

Rodents that walk into a glue trap become stuck in the nontoxic glue. Glue traps rely on strategic placement along rodent runways and are thrown away once the rodent is caught. Glue traps are available in covered or uncovered form.

Live traps enable people to catch rodents and release them outdoors, rather than killing them. Live traps are usually used for catching mice and come in single or multi-animal designs.

For more information on how to use d-CON® products, you can watch the "How to" videos which will explain in detail the process for setting the baits. You can also find good information about rodent prevention in the Rodents 101 section.

 How do I know if I need to use baits or traps?
 How do I know if I have a rodent in my home?
 Where should I place my mouse trap and baits?
 How long do they work? When do they need to be replaced?
 How do I know that I've trapped them all?
 How much rodent bait do I need?
 If my pet eats the rodent bait, could it die?
 If my pet eats a dead rodent that may have eaten d-CON®, will it die?
 What preventive measures can I take to ensure a rodent free home?
 What if I'm unsatisfied with the results of my purchased d-CON® products?
 What Are the Best Ways to Get Rid of Mice?
 General Questions
 
 How do d-CON® products compare to others on the market?
 What are the different kinds of rodent control measures?

Commercially available mouse and rat control products are effective and fall into two different categories – baits and traps.

Baits are available in pellets or blocks contained in a bait station. Baits should be used in low traffic, hard-to-reach areas such as basements, garages and attics. Baits are an ideal way to avoid contact with rodents, because once they've eaten the bait, they leave the area to die, generally going outside to seek water. Baits are safe and highly effective if used according to directions.

Most common rat and mouse poisons fall into the anticoagulant category. These products, long-acting warfarins, reduce the clotting of blood, and result in death from internal bleeding or anemia, usually within 4-10 days.

Traps are ideal for high traffic areas. Three types of traps are used commercially: snap traps, glue traps and live traps.

Snap traps are the traditional wooden design and they are baited with food like peanut butter, nuts or cheese. Snap traps are intended to be humanely lethal, but require disposal of a dead or injured rodent.

Rodents that walk into a glue trap become stuck in the nontoxic glue. Glue traps rely on strategic placement along rodent runways and are thrown away once the rodent is caught. Glue traps are available in covered or uncovered form.

Live traps enable people to catch rodents and release them outdoors, rather than killing them. Live traps are usually used for catching mice and come in single or multi-animal designs.

For more information on how to use d-CON® products, you can watch the "How to" videos which will explain in detail the process for setting the baits. You can also find good information about rodent prevention in the Rodents 101 section.

 How do I know if I need to use baits or traps?
 How do I know if I have a rodent in my home?
 Where should I place my mouse trap and baits?
 How long do they work? When do they need to be replaced?
 How do I know that I've trapped them all?
 How much rodent bait do I need?
 If my pet eats the rodent bait, could it die?
 If my pet eats a dead rodent that may have eaten d-CON®, will it die?
 What preventive measures can I take to ensure a rodent free home?
 What if I'm unsatisfied with the results of my purchased d-CON® products?
 What Are the Best Ways to Get Rid of Mice?
 d-CON® Traps
 d-CON® Baits
 EPA Inquiries